12 Turkish Traditions You Should Know About

12 Turkish Traditions You Should Know About

Turkish Traditions – Some of our habits, which are a part of our daily life, are from Ottoman periods, and some are from older ones. However, each of them has virtues such as benevolence, solidarity, helping people in need, and kindness. On the other hand, some details that have been a part of our lives for a long time have not only affected modern Turkish life but also affected different parts of the world. We present interesting details of our culture to you.

In the Ottoman Period, putting a yellow flower in front of the glass meant that it was sick at home. Neighbourhood residents who saw the yellow flowers in the glass would not make noise in front of the house; children would not play in front of that house so as not to disturb the sick.

Ayran in Turkish Culture

Ayran is one of Turkeys most popular drink is believed to have been discovered by Göktürks. This popular drink has entered our lives with added water to dilute the taste of sour yoghurt.

Ayran in Turkish Culture

Unexpected Guest Concept

The concept of “unexpected guests”; is one of the valuable details of our culture. According to our traditions, our doors are always open to hungry people. It is known that especially in Ramadan, people who are in good financial conditions hold their home; doors open during the iftar hour so that the hungry people enter and sit at the table without hesitation.

Unexpected Guest Concept

Turkish Coffee Tradition

When a guest comes to the house, a glass of water is served next to the coffee. If the guest was hungry, he/she would drink water, and if the guest was full, he/she would drink coffee. So the host would immediately understand whether the guest is hungry or not and prepare the table.

Turkish Coffee Tradition

Traditional Turkish Delight

There is no definite information as to whether the Turkish delight, the traditional dessert of Anatolia, was discovered in the 15th or 18th century. However, it is clear that the Turkish delight, which became popular in Europe in the 18th and 19th centuries is the ancestor of many confectioneries today.

Traditional Turkish Delight

Condolences and Remembrance

Most of our traditions include virtues such as helping each other. One of the best examples of this is that when a local inhabitant dies, everyone sends food to that house for 10 days. In this way, they supported the painful family.

Condolences and Remembrance

Dishing out Lokma (Like Doughnuts)

Protecting yourself from the evil eye or to banish a calamity … When a house or a car is bought … a blessed night or an eve … And for many other reasons, spilling by spoonfuls of yeast dough into hot oil and making Lokma, then saying, “wear it well!”; What a good custom to dish out door to door.

Dishing out Lokma (Doughnuts)

Turkish Traditions & Share the Pain

It is one of the oldest customs of Anatolia; dishing out halva on the 7th, 40th and 52nd days of death… In fact, this is the saddest of the “doing good”; tradition because people have recently lost a relative.

Turkish Traditions & Share the Pain

Tea in Turkish Culture

The type of glass that we can describe as handles was first produced in the glass factory established in Beykoz in the 1900s. It has taken its place thin waisted tea glasses over time. This glass has such an important place in our culture that drinking tea is not even called tea without this glass. Although the new generation prefers mugs for all kinds of drinks, nothing doesn’t replace a thin waisted glass for a tea addict.

Tea in Turkish Culture

Spilling Water Behind Someone Who is a Passenger

Spilling water behind a person who goes away from their own home, neighbourhood, village or hometown for a while means “go and come safe and sound”; Sometimes it is the reason for the person or car to get wet because it is spilt ahead of time, but when a bowl of water is pouring into the road, it means “go as soon as possible, come as soon as possible.”

Spilling Water Behind Someone Who is a Passenger

Evil Eye Talisman in Turkish Culture

Blue evil eye talismans, designed to resemble the shape of the eyes, are believed to be protective of everything and everyone, living and inanimate. Wearing the evil eye talisman somewhere is one of our mothers; favourite customs. Having an evil eye talisman is one of the most artistic ways of protecting from the evil eye in our tradition.

Evil Eye Talisman in Turkish Culture

Carpets Washed in the Streets

Turkish Traditions – Fortunately, carpet washing machines came out and we were introduced to the less tiring method of cleaning. Otherwise, it was inevitable that we would encounter the carpets thrown in front of the door, the aunts who were in water up to their knees, the children who turned such a serious work into a playground, and the foam that stretched in the water along the street.

Carpets Washed in the Streets

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